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Will the world ever go back to how it was before? Probably not

Ok, so we are more than a year on from the original 'family meeting' and a lot has changed. From where we live, where or rather if we go on holiday, how we socialise and how we shop.

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Source: Pexels

People need to learn how to recognise people (they might even know) by their eyes and hair colour or style. But like how we have needed to change our daily online and offline behaviour, how things used to be to how things are now and will be in the future, will require constant change and innovation.

We have seen some major and impressive (not to mention quick to market) innovation come from the likes of Checkers with their Sixty60 app to get groceries delivered to your home in 60 minutes and WildEarth TV with their virtual game drives as creative ways for viewers to still experience the bush whilst at home.


But, will the world ever go back to how it was before? Probably not and here is why.

1. New industries will emerge


• The word "industries" is probably a stretch, but certainly new jobs and opportunities
• With an upheaval affecting and displacing millions of previously employed people, it will only be a matter of time before new avenues and tactics are investigated and explored. From change comes growth.

2. Work from home/remote work will take on more and more influence


• This will allow employers to attain talent from further away than was physically possible before, as well as save on office space costs
• This will give employees a greater flexibility over their work days and better use of available time (as travel time will no longer apply)

3. Convenience trumps cost


• Shopping habits during both the early days and months (and a year) into lockdown show that convenience was the number one factor when it came to consumer purchases
• This will drive both retail and online stores to cater to their shoppers' need for convenience, providing offers and services we likely haven't seen before to further offer convenience to the shopper
• Is it too unrealistic to think that one day we'll do most of our grocery shopping simply by ticking a "Repeat order?" button once a week?


Companies, especially e-commerce ones, that have seen a significant uptick in online sales over the last 12 months, will need to think differently about how they attract customers to their site above the plethora of overnight e-tailers that seem to have popped up.

We believe this will be done by consistently challenging ourselves, learning more about our customers and what makes them tick, and finding opportunities to meet a need.

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