Strand ahoy! Image Wizard
Human Genome Project: new alcohol abuse study could help us finally unlock secrets to beating genetic diseases

Human Genome Project has not lived up to the hype on beating disease, but a new alcohol abuse study could change that...

By Alasdair Mackenzie 13 hours ago

Reducing salt intake can save lives. Shutterstock
Salt is bad for you: but how it affects your body is still frontier science

Research has shown that excess salt intake is harmful to people's health. It can lead to high blood pressure and increase the risk of heart disease and stroke...

By Alta Schutte & Michél Strauss 3 days ago

Professor Steve Kerrigan
New drug shows promise for treating sepsis

Research into a new breakthrough therapy in the fight against sepsis has shown that a drug has potential to stop all sepsis-causing bacteria from triggering organ damage in the early stages of the condition...

11 Mar 2019

Dedicated cannabis expo set for Cape Town in April
Dedicated cannabis expo set for Cape Town in April

The Cannabis Expo, a trade and consumer exhibition dedicated to the cannabis industry, is set be held at Sun Exhibits at GrandWest in Cape Town from 4 to 7 April...

11 Mar 2019

Health workers in Liberia at the height of the 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak. Ahmed Jallanzo/EPA
Ebola in the DRC: the race is on between research and the virus

Since August last year the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been facing its 10th Ebola virus disease outbreak. As of early March this year, 907 cases and 569 deaths have been reported...

By Yap Boum, Jean-Jacques Muyembe & Sabue Mulangu 8 Mar 2019

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), shown here as tiny purple spheres, causes the disease known as AIDS. Mark Ellisman and Tom Deerinck, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research
A cure for HIV? Feasible but not yet realised

This week a team of scientists and physicians from the UK published news of a second HIV positive man, in London, who is in long-term (18-month) HIV remission after undergoing treatment for Hodgkins lymphoma...

By Allison Webel 8 Mar 2019

Photo: RCSI
Anti-rejection drugs increase skin cancer risk in multiple kidney transplant patients

A study led by researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) has analysed the pattern of skin cancer rates in kidney transplant patients, which suggests the increased risk is related to the anti-rejection medications.

6 Mar 2019

Photo: Kim Cloete
Community-wide HIV prevention strategy can reduce new infections

Findings from HPTN 071 (PopART) study show that delivering a community-based prevention strategy can substantially reduce new HIV infections...

By Kim Cloete 5 Mar 2019

Andrii Vodolazhskyi/Shutterstock
Cancer growth in the body could originate from a single cell - target it to revolutionise treatment

Cancer remains a frightening and largely incurable disease. The toxic side effects of chemotherapy and radiation make the cure often seem as bad as the ailment, and there is also the threat of recurrence and tumour spread...

By Michael P Lisanti 21 Feb 2019

Will innovative trends help to further boost SA's vitamins industry?
Will innovative trends help to further boost SA's vitamins industry?

As the lifestyle of individuals become increasingly busy, many are seeking more efficient ways to remain fit and healthy, while also boosting their energy levels...

Issued by Insight Survey 18 Feb 2019

Tech startups have two days left to enter the Sanofi Healthcare Innovation Challenge
Tech startups have two days left to enter the Sanofi Healthcare Innovation Challenge

Sanofi a leading life-sciences company, is looking to partner with Africa's startups to assist in finding innovative solutions to improve healthcare in Africa...

Issued by Britespark Communications 14 Feb 2019

Antibody could increase cure rate for blood, immune disorders
Antibody could increase cure rate for blood, immune disorders

An antibody-based treatment can gently and effectively eliminate diseased blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow to prepare for the transplantation of healthy stem cells...

14 Feb 2019

What goes into some of the world's innovative, life-changing cancer medications
What goes into some of the world's innovative, life-changing cancer medications

Next time you or a loved-one take medication, whether an over-the-counter pain-killer, chronic medication, or a breakthrough treatment, take a moment to think about its origins...

Issued by G&G Digital 13 Feb 2019

Professor Bernardo Rapoport
Breakthroughs in immuno-oncology provide new treatment options

Cancer a significant and growing problem for South Africa, with more than 70,000 new cases of cancer were diagnosed in 2014.

13 Feb 2019

Post-surgical death stats higher than TB, malaria & HiV combined
Post-surgical death stats higher than TB, malaria & HiV combined

A study by researchers at UCT and University of Birmingham shows that 4.2-million people die each year within 30 days of surgery, more than from HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria combined (2.9-million)...

7 Feb 2019

Set of genes predicts severity of dengue
Set of genes predicts severity of dengue

There's no such thing as a "good" case of dengue fever, but some are worse than others, and it's difficult to determine which patients will make a smooth recovery and which may find their condition life-threatening...

4 Feb 2019

Is medicine cure? Treatment? Healing? Understanding? Or a bit of all those things. Kenishiroti/Shutterstock
What is medicine? Why it's so important to answer this question

What is medicine? We recognise it in all societies past and present. But the nature of medicine differs so greatly from place to place and time to time that it's difficult to offer a single answer...

1 Feb 2019

New osteomyelitis treatment without antibiotics
New osteomyelitis treatment without antibiotics

A new treatment has been developed for the particularly difficult-to-treat bone infection, osteomyelitis. The one-step solution kills bacteria and bone growth without using antibiotics. ..

31 Jan 2019

Global evidence suggests that alcohol advertisements increase adolescents’ favourable attitudes towards drinking. Shutterstock
How easy access to alcohol, and adverts, affect women in South Africa

Public health research suggests that concerns about alcohol advertising and accessibility warrant strong regulatory action...

By Leslie London & Neo Morojele 30 Jan 2019

Personalised medicine aims to tailor treatment according to each person’s genetic makeup. Shutterstock
Why African countries need to give genomic research a major boost

All organisms are unique. Each having a set of genetic instructions for their build-up and maintenance. This set of genetic instructions is contained in genes that makeup a genome...

By Lamech Mwapagha 30 Jan 2019

SU's new BMRI
Construction starts on SU's Biomedical Research Institute

Construction of a R1bn new state-of-the-art research facility based at Stellenbosch University's Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS) commenced with a sod-turning ceremony on 25 January...

28 Jan 2019

Are genetics a factor in individual injury risk profiles?
Are genetics a factor in individual injury risk profiles?

UCT researchers have used an innovative approach to generate data that provides a DNA sequence road map that can be used to explore people's susceptibility to musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries...

24 Jan 2019

Risk of suicide - as well as depression - found in the genome
Risk of suicide - as well as depression - found in the genome

Researchers have discovered several genetic variants that signal the risk of serious suicide attempts and noted some variants have also been linked to major depressive disorder...

24 Jan 2019

Yale scientists examine how an immune system protein helps suppress HIV
Yale scientists examine how an immune system protein helps suppress HIV

Much of the research on HIV has focused on preventing infection but little is understood about how the body keeps the virus in check post-infection. A new study by Yale investigators reveals the role of a protein that serves to block HIV gene expression once it has entered human cells...

By Ziba Kashef 23 Jan 2019

Gregory Scherrer and his collaborators have identified in mice an ensemble of cells that seems to specifically function as an on-off switch for pain aversion. 
Paul Sakuma
Researchers discover the brain cells that make pain unpleasant

If you step on a tack, neurons in your brain will register two things: that there's a piercing physical sensation in your foot, and that it's not pleasant...

18 Jan 2019

Dr Paige Fox
New sensor monitors blood flow after vascular surgery

Stanford University researchers have developed a battery-free, wireless and biodegradable sensor that could make it easier for doctors to monitor the success of blood vessel surgery...

17 Jan 2019

Shutterstock
Why does malaria recur? How pieces of the puzzle are slowly being filled in

Some people suffer from repeated attacks of malaria. These can occur weeks to months or longer after contracting the disease...

By Miles B Markus 17 Jan 2019

Around 18% of previously treated TB cases are drug resistant. Shutterstock
How we used computers to figure out drugs that can beat drug-resistant TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death from infectious diseases. Globally, it accounts for around 1.3 million deaths and 10.4 million people develop the disease every year...

By Ruben Cloete 16 Jan 2019

Professor Sally-Ann Cryan
Breakthrough in TB treatment

A new practical treatment for tuberculosis (TB) has the potential to be scaled-up and mass-produced for clinical testing, has been developed...

8 Jan 2019

Show more