MediFin announces its Top Loyalty Partners for 2018
MediFin announces its Top Loyalty Partners for 2018

MediFin Financial Services has again awarded their most loyal partners. These prestigious awards recognise their top partners who display great customer service, strategic alliance and top affiliate behaviour. The Top Loyalty Awards were introduced in 2017 and has grown from 500 contenders in the previous year to over 800 contenders in 2018, an increase of 60%. The period 1 January to 31 October was used to establish the winners.

Issued by Medifin Financial Services 10 minutes ago

Rifut Atun
The big 3 questions on healthcare and AI

In an October 22, 2018 article in the Journal of Global Health, Rifat Atun, professor of global health systems at Harvard Chan School, and co-authors write that machine learning - a field of artificial intelligence in which computers are programmed to "learn" from large quantities of data and to progressively improve performance on certain tasks - has the potential to transform health systems.

By Karen Feldscher 3 hours ago

Estranged bedfellows: Why the private sector remains wary of universal healthcare
Estranged bedfellows: Why the private sector remains wary of universal healthcare

Globally, one in four private healthcare groups surveyed won't work with governments.

By Joan van Dyk 6 hours ago

Healthcare industry needs collaboration to curb fraud waste and abuse
Healthcare industry needs collaboration to curb fraud waste and abuse

Poor collaboration at the right level, the lack of accountability and no proactive participation were identified as some of the stumbling blocks in the fight against malfeasance in the healthcare industry.

22 hours ago

In this 2012 photo, grandmother Janet Kitheka, 63, collects her adopted “granddaughter” Lucy, 13, at the end of the school day in the yard of the Hot Courses Primary School, in the village of Nyumbani which caters to children who lost their parents to HIV, and grandparents who lost their children to HIV in Kenya.
Aspirin could help reduce HIV infections in women

With nearly two million new infections and one million associated deaths each year, the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) pandemic is alive and well. Thirty-seven million people are now living with HIV, more than half of whom are women.

By Colin Graydon and Monika Kowatsch 23 hours ago

Jamani Caillet/EPFL
Spinal implant breakthroughs are helping people with paraplegia walk again

Someone in the world suffers a spinal cord injury every one to two minutes, often leading to irreversible and life-changing loss of movement and feeling. But two research groups recently achieved something that had never been done before. By implanting electrical devices directly on the spinal cord, they reversed some of the effects of the spinal cord injury and allowed people to independently walk again.

2 days ago

There already exist some promising new antibiotic therapies, and more are in the pipeline. However, our economic model prevents researchers from moving them out onto the market.
(Shutterstock)
Humanity under threat from antibiotic-resistant infections

I grew up believing in the forward trajectory of progress in science and medicine - that human health would continue to improve as it had for hundreds of years. As I progressed through my own career in health sciences, I continued to be optimistic.

By Gerry Wright 2 days ago

World Diabetes Day 14 November - Preventing diabetes - key to a longer and better life
World Diabetes Day 14 November - Preventing diabetes - key to a longer and better life

The prevalence of diabetes in adults is increasing worldwide, and it is predicted that by 2040, this condition will become one of the leading causes of death in South Africa.

By Douglas Craythorne, Issued by Cipla 16 Nov 2018

New drug regimen to treat lymphatic filariasis
New drug regimen to treat lymphatic filariasis

A new triple drug therapy with the potential to reduce the time to treat and break transmission of lymphatic filariasis (LF) from at least five years down to two years is being piloted in Kenya.

16 Nov 2018

Using the eye to "see" diseases of the brain
Using the eye to "see" diseases of the brain

The eye is often quoted as the window to the soul, but paediatric neurosurgeon, Dr Llewellyn Padayachy, believes it is also the window to the brain. Assessing pressure inside the brain is a vital part of diagnosing certain neurosurgical conditions including brain tumours, cranial deformities, traumatic brain injury and infection. Previously, diagnosis involved drilling a hole in the skull in order to measure this pressure. This invasive and expensive method however, comes with the risk of infection and bleeding.

16 Nov 2018

Yellow mongoose probably don’t come to mind when thinking of scavengers - but they have been found to scavenge and scatter body parts. Jonathan Pledger/Shutterstock
How scavengers can help forensic scientists identify human corpses

When the police recover skeletonised, burnt or heavily decomposed bodies, they need forensic experts to make sense of what they've found. One important question in such cases is: when did the person die?

By Victoria Gibbon 15 Nov 2018

Putting the lid on medical aid fraud
Putting the lid on medical aid fraud

Last year, medical aids lost at least R15-R20bn of total private healthcare industry spend to fraud, with the Board of Healthcare Funders of Southern Africa (BHF) reporting about 10 to 15% of all claims as fraudulent, abusive or wasteful. Approximately 3 to 4% of the R160-billion medical industry is pure fraud. The instances of medical fraud can be reduced, but it will take fundamental shifts in a number of areas, including the way medical schemes are structured and the efficiency of state health care.

By Paul Midlane 14 Nov 2018

X-ray of the lungs in a 5-year-old child who has pneumonia. Shutterstock
It's time to go back to basics in the fight against childhood pneumonia

Pneumonia is a respiratory infection that affects the lungs. The viruses and bacteria that cause the disease are spread through airborne droplets from a cough or sneeze. An infection can cause the lungs to fill with pus and fluid, making breathing and oxygen intake difficult. And while anyone can get pneumonia, children with weakened immune systems or underlying illnesses are more susceptible. That's why, pneumonia kills more than a million children every year across the world.

By Nicole Wolter 14 Nov 2018