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South Africa launches own version of Cards Against Humanity

After playing Cards Against Humanity, marketing entrepreneur Jonathan Berkowitz decided to find a way to introduce the game to South Africans. Cards Against Humanity is an American card game, wherein players fill blank sentences with words or phrases, usually offensive or politically incorrect, on playing cards.
The well-known game has been available online in American, British, and Australian versions. Berkowitz felt that South Africa, given its melting pot of political incorrectness, required its own unique game and asked South Africans to send in their submissions through an online document that went viral on Facebook.


Berkowitz says, “Our country has some serious ongoing political and cultural problems. However, South Africans are amazing in the way that, despite our issues and differences, we can always laugh at ourselves. We are aiming to make Cards For South Africa an inclusive game, where a diverse group of South Africans can sit around a table and play together - uniting us through humour and fun. As you well know, unity¬†through humour is a South African speciality.”

Berkowitz describes being the springboard for people’s submissions, sometimes, a tough job. “We have had a team of dedicated copywriters, a designer, and app developers, all putting the card game together in their spare time.”¬†

How it all works


The suggestions are selected and sent to a volunteer copywriter who edits incorrect grammar; these are then passed to a volunteer designer who adds the cards to a downloadable PDF document, which is freely available to anyone who signs up on the Cards for South Africa website.


The current pack contains 540 cards, but Berkowitz is planning on releasing an expansion pack as soon as possible. The expansion packs will automatically be sent out to the email database of individuals who initially signed up. There is also an app for the game underway; this will allow up to 12 people to play together on their iOS or Android phones. The game will also cater for a wider range of players such as under-18s, sports-only fans, as well as politics and pop culture-specific genres.

“It’s a great way to keep the game alive and South Africans laughing,” says Berkowitz.

The game will remain non-profit in order to ensure that each and every person can download it for free.

If you want to see a sneak preview of the cards check out Cards for South Africa on Instagram and if you want to submit a card suggestion click here.
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